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DARIAH Annual Event 2020: Scholarly Primitives

November 10 - November 12

Due to COVID-19, the DARIAH Annual Event 2020 is now POSTPONED to fall

Please save the new dates: November 10-13, 2020 | Zagreb, Croatia

DARIAH Annual Event

DARIAH is a European Research Infrastructure for the Humanities and Arts. Its mission is to empower scholarly communities with digital methods to create, connect and share knowledge about culture and society. The DARIAH Annual Event offers the DARIAH community and humanities scholars in general the possibility to present results and new ideas; to meet and network. Participation in the Annual Event is free of charge, but registration is required.

Scholarly Primitives

It has been twenty years since John Unsworth famously formulated scholarly primitives — discovering, annotating, comparing, referring, sampling, illustrating and representing — as a set of basic scholarly activities across disciplines, theoretical frameworks or eras. We will use the DARIAH Annual Event 2020 as an opportunity to re-evaluate and probe the notion and scope of scholarly primitives in the context of the ongoing developments in the field of Digital Humanities and DARIAH’s continuous efforts in shaping an effective and sustainable research infrastructure that meets the needs of humanities scholars. Some of the questions that we hope to ask are: can we — and should we — put our conceptualization of scholarly primitives into a historical perspective as an expression of a particular stage in the development of Digital Humanities? Have scholarly primitives been conceptually robust enough to keep up with the field, which now includes big data, visual analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence? Finally, are scholarly primitives — and the way we speak of research as we build tools to support it — free of ideology and bias?

DARIAH is happy to announce John Unsworth as a keynote speaker at the Annual Event 2020.


Scholarly Primitives

It has been twenty years since John Unsworth first formulated scholarly primitives as a set of recursive and interrelated functions that form the foundations of research activities across disciplines, theoretical frameworks or eras. Ever since, these basic scholarly functions  — discovering, annotating, comparing, referring, sampling, illustrating and representing — have proved to be useful not only for categorizing the fundamentals of knowledge production in the humanities, but also as a framework for conceptualizing Digital Humanities tools which support these processes.

The time is ripe to revisit and freshly interrogate both the notion and the scope of scholarly primitives. To what extent does this particular set of scholarly primitives still correspond to our understanding of what humanities scholars do on a day-to-day basis? Has our understanding of research workflows changed over time significantly enough to require a new classification? Can we — and should we — put our conceptualization of scholarly primitives into a historical perspective as an expression of a particular stage in the development of Digital Humanities? Have scholarly primitives been conceptually robust enough to keep up with the field, which now includes big data, visual analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence? Finally, are scholarly primitives — and the way we speak of research as we build tools to support it — free of ideology and bias?

These theoretical questions frame and encapsulate the challenges of building a digital research infrastructure and developing state-of-the art tools that aid humanities scholars in their work. They make us think about whether research infrastructures are capable of supporting each stage of the research process and how we can best assess their scope and effectiveness.  They also bring into focus the question of whether the development of new tools and methods is simply changing the practicalities of conducting research, or whether it is also expanding the horizons of knowledge production in the humanities in more fundamental ways. What are the gaps and discontinuities in our understanding of scholarly primitives and, more generally, DH tools and methods that we should address in order to build comprehensive, flexible, dynamic, open and sustainable research infrastructures?

DARIAH is happy to announce John Unsworth as a keynote speaker at the Annual Event 2020.

Call for Participation

The upcoming DARIAH Annual Event combines different forms of encounter and exchange between DARIAH researchers and the wider research communities. The call for participation is divided into two streams:

 

  1. Pre-conference activities

    1. WG Meetings

    2. Workshops

  2. Conference activities

    1. Papers

    2. Posters/Demos

    3. Synergy Sessions

 

For all contributions, a title and an abstract (max. 500 words) are to be submitted via the SciencesConf system. The abstracts will be published as a book of abstracts. The deadline for all submissions is 5 January 2020. Please note that all submissions will be subject to reviCroacrcew by at least two members of the Programme Committee. The Programme Committee will evaluate the quality of the proposal and reserves the right to decline proposals or assign them to a different category, if necessary. Notification of acceptance can be expected by 14 February.

Details

Start:
November 10
End:
November 12
Event Category:
Website:
https://dariah-ae-2020.sciencesconf.org/

Venue

Zagreb
Croatia (Local Name: Hrvatska) + Google Map

Organizer

DARIAH
Website:
https://www.dariah.eu/